Migration from Mac Power PC Quicken 2004 to latest Quicken Mac version

I had my Mac power PC die running Quicken 2004.  Want to migrate files to Quicken Mac Essentials.  After reading community notes see i need Quicken Mac 2007 as interim migration release.  Have purchased Quicken Mac 2007 but now find I need to first migrate files from power PC format to newer intel file format to support use on new iMac running latest operation system release.  Can anyone help me?
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    You actually didn't really need 2007 in this case (the convertor for Essentials actually is a stripped down version of 2007)

    What your problem is going to be is-without access to a PowerPC machine (or one with Rosetta), you can't convert 2004 files. The convertor and the Lion compatible version of 2007 (which you likely purchased) can only process 2005 and newer (what they support)

    Now, if you have access to an older PPC mac or one running 10.5 or 10.6, post back and I will explain how to do the conversion.
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      I have access to my son's Mac power pc.  Can copy the 2004 files i had on backup to it.  Just need to know the step by step process to get it done.  Even have Quicken 2004 on disc so i could install that if needed on his pc.  Greatly appreciate any help you can provide.
      • You will want to get a refund for the copy of 2007-you can't convert to that Intel version and it won't run on your son's machine.

        In short, there are two copies of the QFUE-you want to be using the older PPC one on your son's machine. While unsupported, this will likely import your data.

        See FAQ:Converting. About halfway through I address how to do such a conversion. It really isn't complicated.

        http://www.youtube.com/user/MrJrs8084/videos

        (and bookmark this site-you will need it to help you get put to speed with Essentials.)
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      As I sit here typing I'm almost certain I've had a Homer Simpson "duh" moment.  Copied the PPC program and qdfm file to flash drive.  Took to son's house and put flash drive in his PPC.  Ran conversion program which could not read the qdfm file.   Just now thinking I should have installed the conversion program on my son's PPC and then tried to covert the qdfm file on the flash drive.

      Can you confirm my thought is correct?


      • I think you are correct: It is the PPC version of the Quicken File Exchange Utility that you need to run on your son's machine. This will convert the .qdfm to a .qdfx, and then you import that into Essentials. (If, for some reason the QFEU doesn't recognize your old data file, users have suggested dragging the file to the dock icon and it will convert.

        If you are having trouble locating the PPC version on your disk image or CD, you can download it here: (yes, Intuit said I could link this)

        https://www.dropbox.com/s/2kspn4jmmt6bafl/Quicken%20File%20Exchange%20Utility.zip
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      Thanks - will update you tomorrow when I again try to convert the file.
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        Turns out I've been running Quicken for Mac 2007 on PPC.  With old machine dead I looked at software boxes and had 2004 but didn't realize my wife had given 2007 to son.  Tried to open qdfm file on son's machine in 2007 and got message it can not load the file.  Any suggestions??
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        Thanks for your help.  Contacting quicken support.  My data file doesn't have the show contents package on it.  
        • Is it appearing as a folder?
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        No -it's a qdfm file.  But I hit the point on the link you sent where the "show package contents" option does not appear on the file.  So my next best option now is to take the hard drive from my dead PPC and put it in my son's PPC; open quicken there hopefully and create a new backup file.  Hopefully it will then be read by Quicken Essentials.  Wanted to avoid fooling around with hardware but I was told my qdfm backup file is bad by Quicken support.  They couldn't open it either.  Thanks again for all of your help.
        • FYI - I was able to put my disk in my sons PPC and then migrate a new saved file to my iMac.  Disapponted in Essentials migration and decided instead to go back to 2007.  Wish I hadn't spent the money on Essentials.
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        Jules in NC here.

        I would CAUTION anyone trying to upgrade from Quick for Mac 2004 to Quicken Essentials. I did it and, although Essentials had some interesting features, the year-to-year reports and totals DO NOT JIBE.

        Spoke with Intuit's Rae Nell Hicks and Dale Knievel, and they BOTH acknowledge there are some UNRESOLVED issues.

        OUCH!!!!!!

        I ended up re-keystroking 2 months of entries into my old, reliable Quicken for Mac 2004.
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          Thanks for the info.  My final resolution after looking more closely at Quicken Essentials was to use Quicken 2007 on my iMac.  Essentials just isn't as easy to use.  I was fortunate enough to be able to put my my PPC hard disk in my son's PPC and then I migrated from a saved file on his machine.  All went well into 2007.  Also tried Essentials.  Migration was a mess.  Lost all my manual investment file transaction history and had numerous other file issues.  Plus the look and feel of Essentials just wasn't as easy to use as I expected; especially when it came to the reports. Plan to stay on 2007 for a while.  Wish i hadn't spent the money on Essentials.
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